Alexandra Hasluck: How One Strong Woman Changed The Course Of Australian History

This article from The Age reports that Alexandra Hasluck, the wife of Sir Paul Hasluck, insisted her husband not stay on as Govenor-General in 1974.

Hasluck’s departure led to the appointment of Sir John Kerr as Governor-General.

The article refers to an interview Hasluck gave to former Whitlam minister Clyde Cameron in 1985. Hasluck is quoted as saying he believed Kerr erred in consulting with Fraser during the constitutional crisis.

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Hardman And Hater, Cameron Bows Out With Fire Still Burning

The death of Clyde Cameron received front page coverage in The Australian.

The Australian

Cameron’s funeral was held on March 19, 2008. This picture shows Whitlam and Tom Uren in attendance.

Clyde Cameron funeral

Whitlam’s Press Conference Following Ministerial Reshuffle

Following a week of turmoil that ended in a ministerial reshuffle and the demotion of Jim Cairns and Clyde Cameron, Whitlam held a press conference and faced questions on the loans affair and other matters.

Whitlam made a brief statement (not included on the recording below) and then took questions. The full transcript is shown below.

The press conference took place on Tuesday, June 10, 1975, in Canberra. [Read more…]

Treasurer Frank Crean’s 1974 Budget Speech

The second of the Whitlam government’s three budgets was delivered by the Treasurer, Frank Crean, on September 17, 1974.

The Budget was Crean’s second and last. In December 1974, Whitlam replaced Crean with Dr. Jim Cairns.

The day after the Budget, Prime Minister Gough Whitlam delivered an Address to the Nation. [Read more…]

Whitlam’s Address To The ALP National Conference

In July 1973, Whitlam’s Labor government had been in office for seven months.

Whitlam’s Address to the ALP National Conference provides an insight into his thinking, particularly his belief that the government had been elected with a clear mandate to implement the policies developed in Opposition at the three previous party conferences in 1967, 1969 and 1971.

Prime Minister Gough Whitlam’s Address to the ALP National Conference.

We would have less than ordinary human failings if on this occasion we were not tempted to indulge in all the emotions from nostalgia to euphoria. And our best friends have never suggested that the Australian Labor Party was short on ordinary human failings. There is, nonetheless, a sort of symmetry which would move anybody with a sense of our Party’s history in the fact that we came back to Surfers Paradise for this first National Conference with our first National Government for nearly a quarter of a century. We met here seven years ago for the Special Conference of 1966 – that annus horribilis in the history of Australia and of the Australian Labor Party. We were at the nadir of our fortunes. Yet that Special Conference, held at a time when we were well on our way to the greatest debacle in our Party’s history, strangely enough contained the seeds of our resurgence and ultimate triumph in a way that none of us could have then discerned. We started on the road back then and here. [Read more…]