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Posts published in November 1972

It’s Time: Whitlam’s 1972 Election Policy Speech

The policy speech delivered by Gough Whitlam for the 1972 Federal elections is one of the few such speeches that are remembered decades on. In it, Whitlam set out the “program” he intended to implement in government.

The speech began a tradition of Whitlam commencing with the words first used by Prime Minister John Curtin (1941-45): “Men and women of Australia!”

  • Listen to the opening words of Whitlam’s 1972 Policy Speech
  • Listen to highlights of the speech (10m)
  • Listen to the speech in full as broadcast (30m)
  • Watch the complete speech (30m)
  • This is the Policy Speech for the Australian Labor Party, delivered by Gough Whitlam, at the Blacktown Civic Centre, in Sydney, on November 13, 1972.

    Gough Whitlam

    Podium Version

    This is the speech Whitlam delivered during the 30-minute live telecast of the policy speech on November 13, 1972.

    72-11-13_whitlam-policy-speech_podium-version

    Full Policy Statement

    This is the full policy statement issued by the Australian Labor Party for the 1972 federal elections.

    72-11-13_whitlam-policy-speech_moad

    Men and Women of Australia!

    The decision we will make for our country on 2 December is a choice between the past and the future, between the habits and fears of the past, and the demands and opportunities of the future. There are moments in history when the whole fate and future of nations can be decided by a single decision. For Australia, this is such a time. It’s time for a new team, a new program, a new drive for equality of opportunities: it’s time to create new opportunities for Australians, time for a new vision of what we can achieve in this generation for our nation and the region in which we live. It’s time for a new government – a Labor Government.

    It’s Time: Audio, Video And Lyrics

    “It’s Time” is arguably the most famous political slogan in Australian political history.

    The slogan encapsulated the political mood of 1972, even amongst non-Labor supporters. “It’s time for a change” seemed to be the prevailing mood after 23 years of coalition government which began in 1949 under Robert Menzies.

    The slogan was also made into a song, the lyrics of which are shown below.